Create 3D by Slope to Target exceeding Max?

Good afternoon,

I am crating a retention pond by creating the outline in plan view, setting the profile by constant elevation, and then using the Create 3D by Slope to Target tool to achieve a few slopes and benched areas. When I try to create the last element in this method, I need to create it by a vertical distance of 8.5', but it won't create anything over 3.75' in depth. I think it is related to the fact that my original pond outline has curved corners, and as I offset those inwards, it gets to the point where it can no longer create the curved fillet. I figure I can create separate elements for each of the sides of the ponds with that same tool, but is there a better way to achieve this? I essentially would want a vertical offset of the entire element at a 50% slope.

May not be the best figure, but in the attached image, the circled element is the one that would need to be offset vertically by 8.5' at a 2:1 slope, but is currently shown at 1.5' vertical difference at 2:1. For reference from the outer most element, I slope down at 4:1 for a 4' vertical difference, then a flat shelf 5' wide, then slope down another 4' vertically at 3:1, then a 10' flat shelf, then finally sloping 8.5' vertically at 2:1 to the bottom of the pond.

Please let me know if further information is needed.

Thanks,
Ken

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  • I agree that the issue is likely the fact that the curved corners won't solve once the offset radius gets to zero.

    In ponds like this, I like to use a linear template with the various offsets needed to get to the bottom.  You can create a template which goes all the way from the top with all the various slopes and depths and create the entire pond (top to bottom) in one pass.  Since you have already come this far, then you could make a template with just the last segment of 2:1 slope for 8,5 deep.

    The advantage of using a linear template is not only do you get all the line work in one pass but you also get a corridor surface all the way from top to bottom in the same pass.  This corridor surface is an easy one pick to make a terrain model by elements.

    The same linear template could also be configured to model the berm and outer slopes in the same pass. Or you could make a separate template for the outside.

    Below is a pond template I used recently for a client in Florida. The point named "Edge Berm Inside" corresponds to the top of pond.

    Robert Garrett

    Senior Project Engineer

Reply
  • I agree that the issue is likely the fact that the curved corners won't solve once the offset radius gets to zero.

    In ponds like this, I like to use a linear template with the various offsets needed to get to the bottom.  You can create a template which goes all the way from the top with all the various slopes and depths and create the entire pond (top to bottom) in one pass.  Since you have already come this far, then you could make a template with just the last segment of 2:1 slope for 8,5 deep.

    The advantage of using a linear template is not only do you get all the line work in one pass but you also get a corridor surface all the way from top to bottom in the same pass.  This corridor surface is an easy one pick to make a terrain model by elements.

    The same linear template could also be configured to model the berm and outer slopes in the same pass. Or you could make a separate template for the outside.

    Below is a pond template I used recently for a client in Florida. The point named "Edge Berm Inside" corresponds to the top of pond.

    Robert Garrett

    Senior Project Engineer

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